Schools Programme

Past Speakers

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Dr Hannah Fry

Dr Hannah Fry

Mathematician

"Is life really that complex?"

Dr Hannah Fry is a lecturer in the Mathematics of cities at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA) at University College London. She was trained as a mathematician with a first degree in Mathematics and theoretical physics, followed by a PhD in fluid dynamics. After a brief period working in aerodynamics, she returned to UCL to take up a post-doctoral position researching a relatively new area of science - social and economic complex systems. This led to her appointment as a lecturer in the field in October 2012.

Emma Jane Kirby

Emma Jane Kirby

Linguist

"The power of language: Tolerance, understanding and exploration"

Emma Jane Kirby was educated at Chelmsford County High School for Girls and at St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford, where she studied English. After three years working in local radio (Radio Oxford), she joined BBC Radio 5 Live and then became the Woman’s Hour reporter. In 2001, she began her career as a foreign correspondent, first based in Geneva as a UN Correspondent, then as Europe Correspondent in Brussels. She has made several television and radio documentaries in Afghanistan. She is now a reporter with BBC Radio 4’s the World at One, PM and Broadcasting House, where she focuses on Europe.

Martin Clayton

Martin Clayton

Artist

"The Highest Common Denominator: Bringing art to people"

Born and brought up in North Yorkshire, Clayton studied Natural Sciences and then History of Art at Christ’s College, Cambridge. Since graduating in 1990 he has worked in the Print Room of the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, where since 2013 he has been Head of Prints and Drawings for Royal Collection Trust. He has curated many exhibitions of the drawings in the Royal Collection, ranging from Leonardo da Vinci and Raphael, through Poussin and Canaletto, to Victorian watercolours and contemporary British art.

Howard Goodall CBE

Howard Goodall CBE

Musician

"What we are doing with young people in schools, by teaching them music, is beginning their life-long exploration of music, not creating the finished article. I had been sufficiently enthused at school by the strange alchemy of music to want to learn more. Teachers have a difficult and challenging job and I have enormous admiration for what teachers do. The Prince's Teaching Institute plays an incredibly important role in helping teachers start the engines, so that young people will go on wanting to learn more and in time discover their own musical humility."

Howard Goodall is an award-winning composer of choral music, stage musicals, film and TV scores, is well known as a TV and radio broadcaster. His best-known TV & film themes & scores include Blackadder, Red Dwarf, Q.I., Mr Bean & The Vicar of Dibley. His musicals have been performed in the West End and throughout world, winning many international awards. Goodall has written and presented his own TV documentary series on the theory and history of music. For these he has been honoured with a BAFTA.

Dr Tristram Hunt MP

Dr Tristram Hunt MP

Historian

"Why the Industrial Revolution matters"

Dr Tristram Hunt is Member of Parliament for Stoke-on-Trent Central, and Senior Lecturer in Modern British History at Queen Mary, University of London. He was appointed Shadow Secretary of State for Education in October 2013. In addition to making regular contributions in The Guardian and The Observer, he is the author of The English Civil War: At First Hand (2002) and the award-winning biography, The Frock-Coated Communist: The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels (2009).

Kazuo Ishiguro OBE

Kazuo Ishiguro OBE

Writer; novelist

“The PTI events are imaginatively conceived, superbly organised, and probably unique in this country. To invite committed teachers to come together and debate with leading experts and practitioners in their subjects - and in such intimate and conducive settings! it's a brilliantly simple way to inject fresh ideas, new ambitions and sheer inspiration into classrooms. I always feel excited when asked to participate.”

Kazuo Ishiguro was born in Nagasaki, Japan, in 1954 and came to Britain at the age of five. He is author of six novels, including: Remains of the Day (1989, winner of the Booker Prize) and Never Let Me Go (2005, Corine Internationaler Buchpreis, Serono Literary Prize, Casino de Santiago European Award. Ishiguro’s work has been translated into over 40 languages, and The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go have also been adapted into major films.

Dr Kendra Strauss

Dr Kendra Strauss

Geographer

"Changing geographies of labour and work"

Dr Kendra Strauss is a University Lecturer in the Department of Geography, University of Cambridge. She is an economic geographer with interests in labour market change and feminist political economy, and obtained her MSc and DPhil from the School of Geography at the University of Oxford. Dr Strauss was a Research Associate in Urban Political Economy at University of Glasgow before moving to Cambridge.

Professor Klaus Dodds

Professor Klaus Dodds

Geographer

"Polar scrambles? Making sense of the Arctic and Antarctic"

Professor Klaus Dodds is Professor of Geopolitics at Royal Holloway, University of London, and Academician of the Academy of the Social Sciences. He is the editor of The Geographical Journal and specialises in the geopolitics of the Polar Regions as well as the Falklands/South Atlantic. His publications and books include The Antarctic: A Very Short Introduction (OUP 2012) and he co-edited The Ashgate Research Companion to Critical Geopolitics (Ashgate 2013).

Professor William Fitzgerald

Professor William Fitzgerald

Classicist

"Why study Latin poetry?"

Professor William Fitzgerald is Professor of Latin Language and Literature at King’s College London. His main research interests include Latin poetry and Latin prose (Pliny the Younger and Apuleius). He has written monographs on Pindar and the European Pindaric tradition, on Catullus, and on slavery in Latin literature. His latest publication is Martial: the Epigrammatic World.

Professor Ingo Gildenhard

Professor Ingo Gildenhard

Classicist

"Virgil’s Aeneid in its cultural context"

Professor Ingo Gildenhard is a Lecturer in Classics and a Fellow of King’s College, University of Cambridge. His research interests range from Latin literature (with a special emphasis on the archaic period, Cicero, Virgil, and Ovid) to Roman culture (especially the political culture of the Roman republic) to the Classical Tradition and literary and social theory, including the theory and practice of translation.

Laura McMahon

Laura McMahon

Linguist

"Film and philosophy in contemporary France"

Dr Laura McMahon is a College Lecturer in French at Gonville and Caius College, University of Cambridge. She is the author of Cinema and Contact: The Withdrawal of Touch in Nancy, Bresson, Duras and Denis (Oxford: Legenda, 2012) and the co-editor of Rhythms: Essays in French Literature, Thought and Culture (Bern: Peter Lang, 2008). She is currently developing a project on the politics of community in contemporary French and Francophone cinema and philosophy.

Lord Hennessy

Lord Hennessy

Historian - Residential Eng, His, Geo, MFL, Latin

"Never lose a holy curiosity (Einstein): Or how to get out of bed on a wet Monday in February"

Professor Peter Hennessy is Attlee Professor of Contemporary British History at Queen Mary, University of London. He was recently elected a Fellow of the British Academy. Before joining the Department in 1992, he was a journalist for twenty years with spells on The Times; The Financial Times and The Economist. In 1986 he was co-founder of the Institute of Contemporary British History.

Professor David Midgley

Professor David Midgley

Linguist

"The First World War in German literature"

Professor David Midgeley is Head of Department of German and Dutch and Professor of German Literature and Intellectual History at St John’s College, University of Cambridge. Professor Midgeley’s research has focused extensively on German literature and thought of the period since 1890, with a particular focus on literary modernism. Alongside Christian Emden, he co-edits the series Cultural History and Literary Imagination. He is currently working on cultural developments in the decades before the First World War.

Dr Rob Mulvaney OBE

Dr Rob Mulvaney OBE

Scientist

"Frozen in time: The archive of past climate and atmospheric change"

Dr Robert Mulvaney is the Science Leader of the Chemistry and Past Climate programme at the British Antarctic Survey. He is an Analytical Chemist and Palaeoclimatologist engaged in the reconstruction of the past climate and environment. His major successes include leading the ice core drilling projects to bedrock on Berkner Island (948m), James Ross Island (364m) and Fletcher Promontory (654m) in Antarctica. He has been awarded the Polar Medal for his contribution to polar research in 1999 and the OBE in 2009 for his contribution to science.

Professor Heinz Wolff

Professor Heinz Wolff

Scientist

Hand, eye and brain, over and over and over again: The virtuous circle

Professor Heinz Wolff graduated in Physiology and Physics and probably was the first individual to call himself a “Bioengineer”. In 1983 he founded the self-financing, Institute for Bioengineering at Brunel University. He is now Emeritus Professor of Bioengineering, leading a team which will have an impact on major social problems. Ensuring a good quality of life for the increasing number of frail elderly people is his current priority.

Professor Marcus du Sautoy OBE

Professor Marcus du Sautoy OBE

Mathematician

The Num8er My5teries

Professor Marcus du Sautoy is a professor of mathematics and the Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science at Oxford University. He is a frequent contributor on mathematics to The Times, The Guardian, and the BBC. He lives in London.

Sir Tom Stoppard OM CBE

Sir Tom Stoppard OM CBE

Playwright

Work and play

“The Prince’s Teaching Institute Summer School has established itself as an inspiring reminder of the true purpose of education, to bring the best to the most - to save lives.”